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Saturday, November 5, 2011

Would the Founding Fathers recognize the United States today?


     “Would the Founders recognize the United States today?” “Yes, I believe so.” “Does it matter if they would recognize it?” “Yes, because they created the government for the good of the people and not for the good of the government.” People make a country, not a monarchy, republic, or democracy. If the people give the government power, then the people control the fate of the country.
     James Madison believed the principle of divided power protects the rights of the minority (or the individual) from the majority (or the dominators) within the States. John Adams and Thomas Jefferson were divided over the form of government. For example, “[T]he House of Representatives will derive its powers from the people of America… So far the government is NATIONAL, not FEDERAL. The Senate will derive its power from the State… the government is FEDERAL, not NATIONAL. … [Thus,] the government appears to be of a mixed character, presenting at least as many FEDERAL as NATIONAL features (italics added for emphasis).”
     The Founders acknowledged they were not perfect, and admitted they were politicians.  Although the Founders fought on certain issues, they ultimately compromised on the Constitution through the political processes for the people of the United States. Adams and Hamilton were Federalist; Jefferson was a democratic Republican; and Madison switched his belief from Federalist to Republican. Each had different views on democratic values and virtues. However, they ultimately established the underpinnings for the greatest legal document the United States has today-the superpower democratic nation in human history. These beliefs became the legacy of and stands for the United States today: for the people, by the people, and of the people.
     “Would the Founders recognize the United States today?” “Yes, I believe so.” “Does it matter if they would recognize it?” “Yes, definitely.”  

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